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Cut@Home Blog - Scrapbooking & Card Making Ideas


Easter Cards Featuring Graphic 45 And Spellbinders

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Today I want to share some Easter Cards featuring Graphic 45 Sweet Sentiments papers and several Spellbinders die sets.  I love the beautiful Graphic 45 papers — there are so many different ways that they can be used.  The same is true of Spellbinders die sets — particularly the “card creator” sets.  Together these products make beautiful cards.

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IMG_4386  IMG_4380

I also made some Easter wreath cards using the Graphic 45 papers and a Spring wreath die.

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The key to the cards is to first identify an element on the Graphic 45 papers that will serve as a focal point.  I looked to two papers in the Graphic 45 Sweet Sentiments collection for my card inspiration — “All My Love” and ”Easter Greetings”.  Each paper has a lot of choices to offer, but you first have to “unlock” it from the paper.   This is portion of the “Easter Greetings” paper.

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You can see the elements here are separated into “boxes”, so it is possible to use your paper trimmer to separate the boxes.  Sometimes you can use the item as is, and other times it will be desirable to cut away the “box” and just use the remaining image.  You’ll decide that when you decide how you want the card to look.  For example, I wanted some small images to use with my Easter wreaths, and so the smaller pictures along the side of the paper were perfect.  I just trimmed the extra borders off and they were ready to go.  Other images I wanted to use with the Spellbinders Card Creator dies, and so it was necessary to fussy cut them, at least a little, to fit into the space available.

This is a picture of a portion of the “All My Love” paper.

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Here the images and elements are intertwined, and you need to first figure out how to separate and isolate the image that you want to use for your card.  I began by hand cutting this paper into about thirds.  I started by cutting just underneath the roses (I’m left-handed so I started cutting from the left side of the paper), and between the butterflies, up above the umbrella, and then dipping back down to miss the egg, etc.  Once the paper was in a more manageable size, then I looked at the strip of paper I had cut and determined which images were intact and which I would feature on a card.   I ”freed” those first from the paper strip to avoid any inadvertent  damage while cutting other images.  Usually when I’m making cards, I only cut the images I really need at the time, and I set aside the remaining parts for another time when I will cut out the other useable images to add to my stash.  Please see the short video for a more detailed description of how I “free” images from patterned paper, and also some tips on fussy cutting.

Assembly of the cards is quite easy.  I cut A2-sized background layers (4.25″ x 5.5″) from various solid cardstock.  I like to use metallic cardstock for this since it adds a bit of shimmer and interest.  Then I cut a variety of layers from ivory paper using several of the Spellbinders card creator sets including Tranquil Memories, Filigree Delight, Diamond Effects and Floral Ribbon Threader.  I love the detail that each of these sets adds to a card.  From there it was a matter of determining which element(s) I would select from the “cut” pile, and what layers were appropriate for them.  I added ribbons and other embellishments, as appropriate to finish the cards.  The four cards I made this way are –

IMG_4386  IMG_4380

IMG_4383  IMG_4381

For the “wreath” cards, I did not use one of the Spellbinders die cut layers because I wanted the emphasis to be on the wreath.  Sometimes I just stick with plain edges, etc. to avoid losing my focal point.  For the two wreath cards I cut a colored background layer that was A2-sized (4.25″ x 5.5″), and an ivory layer that was 3-7/8″ x 5-1/8″.  I attached the ivory layer to the background layer using Scor-Tape.  I cut two wreaths — one from green cardstock and one from vellum.  The vellum wreath was placed over the top of the green wreath (you can secure these with adhesive if you like — I did not feel it was necessary).  I wrapped the wreath with ivory/gold baker’s twine, and then adhered it to the card layers using a low dimensional adhesive.  I added the ribbon at the bottom of the card.  Next I added the cut element from the Graphic 45 papers to the bottom corner using regular dimensional adhesive.   Then I decorated the remainder of the wreath using die cut flowers and sequins, and added the ribbon “tie” at the bottom.  The two wreath cards are below –

IMG_4389  IMG_4391

All of these are very easy, simple cards to make.  Of course you can add more to them if you prefer.  Some people cut the image (or parts of the image) two or three times, and pop them on top of one another to create a dimensional image.  You could also separate the images into even smaller parts and change the placement, etc. or pop smaller parts of the design.  Of course glitter always enhances a card and adds to its style.  There are just so many options.  It is all up to individual taste and style.

Supply List

Graphic 45 Sweet Sentiments “Easter Greetings” and “All My Love” papers

Spellbinders die sets – Tranquil Memories, Filigree Delight, Diamond Effects and Floral Ribbon Threader

Spring Wreath die by W Plus 9

Assorted plain cardstock

Vellum

Assorted ribbon, bakers twine and embellishments

Scor-Tape by Scor-Pal — 1/4″ and 1/8″

Dimensional adhesive; low dimensional adhesive

Scotch Quick-Drying glue

 

Thanks and Happy Scrappin’!

Cheryl

MamaSaidShare@wordpress.com

 

Darice Easter Bunny Embossing Folder

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Today I want to share a card using the Darice Easter Bunny embossing folder.  I also want to give you some tips on using things that you already have in your stash in different ways so you can “stretch” both your supplies and your craft budget.

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A successful card always has a good focal point — here I’ve used the bunny face from the Easter Bunny embossing folder.   (The entire embossing folder is darling too, but it doesn’t leave much room for embellishment.  Click here to see the full embossing folder design.)  To isolate the part of the design that I wanted to use, I first cut an oval using my Spellbinders Nestabilities Large Classic Ovals (the largest die), and then carefully placed the oval in my embossing folder and ran it through my Sizzix Big Shot.  I added light (or subtle) color to the embossed image using various colors of Memento ink, applied with small Darice craft marshmallows.  Very quick and easy!  Note that you could also emboss the entire image and then place the oval die on it and cut the appropriate section.  Here you risk losing some of the raised image because it may flatten somewhat as it goes back through the die cutting machine.  It can also be wasteful if you aren’t using other parts of the full embossed image.  I generally only use that method when I’ve embossed something that turns out not suitable for the card in its entirety (it is crooked or off-center, etc.).

Sometimes the hardest part of putting together a card is choosing the right cardstock for the accents and layers.  I try to pick the patterned paper first, and then find a coordinating solid.  Sometimes I have a solid color that I want to use, and then have to work backwards to find a coordinating patterned paper.  That was the case with the bunny card pictured above.  This season I just love the soft peach color, but it can be sooooo hard to find.  I had this A-2 sized (4.25″ x 5.5″) piece of cardstock left from another project, and so just needed to locate a coordinating patterned paper.  Done.  Yay!  The patterned paper was cut 3-7/8″ x 5-1/8″.

The scalloped oval behind the embossed bunny is also cut using a Spellbinders Nestabilities die, “Big Scalloped Ovals” (small).  The largest size die fit nicely with the embossed bunny oval.  Rather than reaching for another sheet of my “precious” stash of soft peach paper, I cut the scalloped oval from the bottom card layer.  Yes, it is okay to do this — just stay in the center of the card so that your patterned paper will completely cover the hole.  No one will know that you did this — and it is a great way to “stretch” each sheet of paper for maximum use.  I also conserve colored papers and patterned papers by making card fronts, and then mounting them on plain white cardstock.  White cardstock is almost always sold at a lower price.

Now it is time to embellish.  Soft peach coordinating embellishments are almost impossible to find.  This is one of the many reasons why I am so grateful for my stash of Copic markers.  With so many colors to choose from, there is always something that will work.  Copics (or another alcohol ink marker) can be used to color lots of different kinds of embellishments — ribbon, pearls, rhinestones, ribbon roses, etc.  Try this with any white or clear embellishment.  Note that other alcohol ink markers will also work (Copic is my preference because of the beautiful, vibrant ink colors).  Some other examples are Spectrum Noir markers, Shin Han art markers, and Sharpie markers.  Yes, you read that right — Sharpie markers!  Sharpies will work, although I don’t like the result as well since the ink and the colors can be a little intense.  Please see the short video for information on how I added color to the various embellishments that I used on the card.

I repeated the bunny card in a number of different color combinations to show you just how easy it is to change the look and match the embellishments.  The embellishments all began as white or clear, and were colored with various Copic markers.

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It is very difficult to have a ready supply of all of the “right” colors of ribbons and other embellishments.  I always keep plenty of “colorable” supplies on hand, and then purchase additional colors that I use frequently or are difficult to reproduce, etc.  You can also use your Copics to “tone down” a color of ribbon  that is too bright, etc. or to change the shade to just the right color.  Just experiment on a small-scale first to find the look that you like.  (Toning down the ribbon often involves using one of the gray markers rather than a color coordinating one.)

Assembling the card is also very easy.  Attach the patterned cardstock to the background layer (the one with the hole in the middle) using Scor-Tape.  Attach the embossed bunny oval to the scalloped oval using low dimensional adhesive.  Be sure to use some of the dimensional adhesive in the center too — sometimes an object this large will sag over time if there isn’t a little dimensional adhesive to support it.  Use Scor-Tape to attach the ovals to the patterned paper.  Attach the ribbon, bow and ribbon rose with Scor-Tape.  Add the pearls or rhinestones to the ribbon (if you use the “cheap” ones like me, you may need to glue them in place).  Mount the card front to an A2-sized card, and stamp a sentiment inside.  Done.  Easy peasey.

Supply list:

Die cutting machine — I used my Sizzix Big Shot

Oval dies — I used Spellbinders Nestabilities Large Classic Ovals and Small Big Scalloped Ovals

Darice “Easter Bunny” embossing folder

various cardstock

paper trimmer

white ribbon – I used May Arts 1/4″ sheer ribbon (white)

White ribbon roses

pearls – white or natural

rhinestones – clear (not the ones that are iridescent and shine in various colors — these don’t take the ink very well)

Scor-Tape by Scor-Pal — I used both 1/4″ and 1/8″

low dimensional adhesive

Assorted Memento ink — I used Toffee Crunch, Lulu Lavender, New Sprout, Cantaloupe

Darice craft marshmallows – small

Thanks and Happy Scrappin’!

Cheryl

MamaSaidShare@wordpress.com

 

Sizzix Umbrella 3-D Die and Big Shot Machine Product Review

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

Today my post is a little different — first I want to show you a fun Sizzix 3-D Umbrella die, and then I want to do a “product review” of the Sizzix Big Shot.  It is finally Spring (although you can’t tell it by the weather), and wedding season will soon be upon us.   The umbrella die is a perfect accessory for bridal showers or weddings, and is also versatile enough to be used for almost any other purpose.

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The umbrellas are just so easy to make using this Sizzix Bigz die.  All it takes is one pass through the Big Shot to cut and score the piece you need for the umbrella top.  Note that the instructions for the die recommend use of a premium crease pad.  I did mine without, and they turned out just fine.  It probably depends on the materials you’re using and other factors, so it is best to do a test cut and see if the crease pad is needed.   You will want to use double-sided paper for the umbrellas.  The inside shows, and you get a much prettier effect with a nice color or cardstock on the inside too.

Assembly of the umbrella is very easy.  I first folded the umbrella die cut along the score lines (you want to do an accordion fold).  There is a tab on one side of the die cut piece.  Add a little quick drying glue to that tab, and press it against the back of the other edge of the umbrella.  Set this piece aside to dry.  For the umbrella pole, you can either use a coffee stir stick (I prefer the round ones) or one of the Doodlebug Pixies (these come in 12 different colors).  I used the Pixies for my project — some of them as they are (where there were good matching colors), and others covered with ribbon for a softer effect (or a better match).  To wrap the Pixie with ribbon, place approximately 1″ of Scor-Tape on a length of ribbon (a 1/4″ or 3/8″ ribbon is easiest to work with).  Remove the Scor-Tape liner.  Fold the ribbon end over the top of the Pixie, and begin wrapping toward the opposite end.  It is usually best to wrap diagonally.  Stop periodically and adjust the ribbon as needed to keep it tight and as wrinkle-free as possible.  When you reach the other end of the Pixie, place another 1″ piece of Scor-Tape on the back of the ribbon.  Carefully wrap the other end of the Pixie so that it is covered, and isn’t too bulky.   You will follow pretty much the same steps to use the Pixies as is, except that you’ll only wrap about 1″ at the top with ribbon rather than the entire length.  The ribbon foundation will help in the assembly.

To finish the umbrella you need two more items:  1) something to act as a foundation piece at the top of the umbrella (provides coverage, a foundation for a pin, etc.); and 2) a floral pin or other decorative pin.  For my umbrellas, I cut a daisy from some daisy trim (usually available for purchase by the yard at most fabric stores) and placed a Maya Road trinket pin in the center of it (there are a lot of fun shapes and sizes including hearts, butterflies, and plain gemstones, etc.).  I placed some quick drying glue on the daisy (the side that will be against the umbrella), and then inserted the pin in the top center of the umbrella.  I held the pin and daisy in place until the glue set, trying to keep the pin centered in the umbrella.  Next I added some of the quick drying glue to the inside center of the umbrella (it is okay to be generous with the glue here, it won’t show and you want to make sure it holds).  Then I inserted the pin into the center of the ribbon-covered Pixie (or coffee stir stick, etc.).  It is important to hold the stick in place for a couple of minutes so that the glue begins to dry.  Once the center pole seemed set in place, I put the umbrella aside to dry, making sure that the proper positioning was maintained, etc. (I found it easiest to lean the center pole of the umbrella against a cup).  After the glue was thoroughly dry, I added a small bow at the bottom of the center pole.

There are many different ways the umbrella can be used.  The die itself is part of the Sizzix wedding collection, but I think the umbrellas would also be appropriate for a baby shower or even just a fun summer party, etc.  I made some umbrellas in bright summer colors to show you how they might look.

 

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Any time you work on a paper crafting project like the umbrellas, everything goes so much better when you have a good die cutting/embossing machine to back you up.  I think the Sizzix Big Shot is a perfect machine for almost any need.  It is so wonderfully versatile –  it works well with just about any die or embossing folder, and will cut many different types of materials.  Of course it pairs well with Sizzix dies of any size or shape (except for the “Pro” dies that only work with the Big Shot Pro) — thick  or thin, large or small.  The Big Shot can also cut using competitor dies — you just need to figure out the correct sandwich.  In most cases the competitor will recommend a sandwich; if not, you can decide on the proper sandwich by picking a Sizzix die that is similar and following the instructions for that.  Sandwich instructions are printed on the multipurpose platform, so they are always close at hand.   I love that in the newest version of the Big Shot, they include an extended multipurpose platform.  This allows use of the longer dies and embossing folders so long as you have the longer cutting plates (in the past you had to purchase the longer platform also).  The Big Shot is just so easy to use!

The kinds of materials that you can cut with the Big Shot (i.e. cardstock, chipboard, mat board, felt, etc.) are pretty much controlled by the type of die that you are using.  Dies like the Bigz dies are designed to cut through the heavier materials  (the package insert usually says what materials are appropriate),  but they can also handle thinner cardstock, etc. with ease — even multiple layers.  Thinner dies won’t do as well with this.   The Big Shot adds so much versatility to your paper crafting.  I love being able to  cut my own chipboard shapes and sturdy boxes, etc.   The Big Shot is also designed for convenient use.  The front and back platforms are long enough that you can use them to set up your sandwiches.  Then it is just a simple crank through the machine and the cutting and/or embossing occurs usually on the first pass.  Although you hear the customary cracks and creaks from time to time (the ones that are a normal part of the die cutting process), you don’t need extra pressure or muscles to crank the materials through.  They slide through easily.   I just love my Big Shot!  Please see the short video for a demonstration of how the Big Shot works.

 

Supplies used

Sizzix Umbrella 3-D die

Sizzix Big Shot machine

assorted cardstock

Doodlebug Pixies in assorted colors

assorted ribbon

Daisy trim

Scotch Quick-Dry Adhesive

Maya Road Trinket Pins (assorted)

 

Thanks and Happy Scrappin!

Cheryl

MamaSaidShare@wordpress.com

Heartfelt Creations Beautiful Juliet Cards

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Today my cards feature the Beautiful Juliet stamp set and Sweet Juliet die set by Heartfelt Creations.  I love the stamp, the beautiful stem and greens with the saying “you are so beautiful to me” along the side.  The die set is also wonderful, and you can create so many different kinds of flowers with it.  I think that these were released around Valentines’ Day, but they are definitely appropriate for use throughout the entire year.  The first card below features both the stamp and the die sets; the second card features only the stamp set.

sweet juliet    heart juliet

The Beautiful Juliet stamp is very easy to use.  It isn’t too big, so you don’t have any issues with covering large areas, etc.  I usually use a green ink for this since it essentially represents the stem and leaves for a flower.  For the two samples, I used Memento Olive Grove ink.  (The samples on the video used Memento Bamboo Leaves ink.)  The important part is to make sure that your stamp block is big enough for the stamp so that you can get a good clear image.  I stamped the image on white cardstock cut 2.5” x 4.75”.

The next step is to make the “Sweet Juliet” flower for one of the cards.  I cut two pieces for the flower using the largest die in the set.  The paper I used was pink metallic vellum.  I found that for this particular flower, using something that is lighter in weight and that has a little flexibility works better than, for example, a heavier weight cardstock.  This is definitely a die that you want to use waxed paper with to make it easier to remove the cut piece.  As you remove the cut image from the die, pull gently and slowly to avoid tearing the paper.  Be sure to cut two of the largest flower pieces.  Once cut, gently curl each petal upward with your fingers to begin to shape the flower.  Assembly is super simple.  You just need a larger brad (one that won’t slip through the large holes already cut in the flower).  One by one, place each of the petals onto the brad (the brad goes from back to front through the hole), and then the brad goes through the center of the flower.  Pause after putting the first flower on the brad (loosely bend the “wings” of the brad to keep the petals from sliding off) and gently straighten out the petals.  When you’re happy with the result, re-open the brad and do the same thing with the second flower – this time trying to stagger the petals in between those of the first flower to fill it out a little.  When the second flower is on the brad, lightly bend the wings down and adjust the petals of both flowers so that they coordinate together.  When you’re satisfied with the result, tighten the brad.  Attach the Sweet Juliet flower to the card with a little Scor-Tape.  Please see the short video for some quick tips on using the Beautiful Juliet stamps and the Sweet Juliet die set.

The “heart” flower is just as easy to build.  I started with some of the May Arts Ribbon satin cut-out hearts.   These are sold by the yard, and attached side-by-side.  To use them I simply cut off the hearts that I needed, carefully trimming around the side curve.   I placed a small piece of Scor-Tape on the back of each heart.   Start by attaching one heart to the stamped image.  For the next heart, slightly overlap it with the first heart, making sure that the points meet.  Repeat this with the remaining three hearts (the May Arts hearts are approx. 7/8”) – you’ll need a total of 5 hearts for the large flower.  I like to add one more heart where the three leaves meet below.

I kept the cards themselves simple so that the attention would be focused on the stamp and die sets.  The background layer is cut 4.25” x 5.5” (A-2 sized).  The patterned paper is cut 3-7/8” x 5-1/8”.  I attached the patterned paper to the background layer with ¼” Scor-Tape.  I attached the stamped panel with the “heart” flower to the card also using Scor-Tape.  The final steps are to add the ribbon, and then attach the card front to a card base.  Super quick and easy!

Supply List:

Heartfelt Creations Beautiful Juliet stamp set

Heartfelt Creations Sweet Juliet die set

Die cutting machine – I used my Sizzix Big Shot

Large decorative brad

Cardstock – a solid and pattern for the layers, white for stamping the flower

Metallic vellum – for the Sweet Juliet flower

May Arts Ribbon – red satin hearts (approx. 7/8” high – sold by the yard)

Ink – I used Memento Olive Grove (Bamboo Leaves in the video)

Scor-Tape by Scor-Pal – ¼”

Ribbon – I used white with a shiny edge

 

Thanks and Happy Scrappin’!

Cheryl

Die-Versions Easter Bunny Cards

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

Today I’m using another really fun Die-Versions die – this time to make Easter Bunny Cards.  The bunnies are also perfect for other Spring or Easter decorations.  This is a single die that makes either a standing or sitting bunny along with accessories.  I love how they put a little scalloped edge around the bunny to make it look more fuzzy and cuddly.

brown bunny  white bunny

sitting bunny

The Die-Versions dies are thin metal dies, so you can use them with almost any die cutting machine.  I chose my Sizzix Big Kick because it is well-suited to this type of cutting.  Although it could cut at least two layers of the heaviest papers, this time I cut one layer at a time to make sure I retained all of the detail.  Since this die focuses on a single animal, you can pretty much cut all of the pieces that you need with just one pass (there are a couple of exceptions – for example, if you want the sitting version you’ll need to cut another foot with foot pads).   The animal parts are conveniently grouped together at the bottom of the die, so you can use a scrap that is approximately 4” x 4.25” to cut the body parts.  You’ll also need a scrap this size (or a group of smaller scraps) to cut the parts that are pink.

Once the pieces are cut, I find it helpful to lay them out on a sheet of contrasting paper to make sure I have everything I need.  Then I used a little Memento ink to “edge” each of the pieces to enhance that cute scalloped cut.  I used London Fog ink for the white bunny and Toffee Crunch ink for the tan bunny.  I added the ink with a Darice foam marshmallow, sponging ink around the edges of each piece (main color only – I did not sponge the pink pieces).   For the main body, I added a little sponged ink to the slit area in the center.  For the face, I used a little Angel Pink to enhance the cheeks, and used a Cool Gray Copic Multiliner to enhance the nose/mouth detail.  Please see this short video for more detail.

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My preference is to assemble the bunny as a stand-alone object – then it can be attached to a card or used elsewhere for a decoration.  The adhesive that I find works best for this is the Scotch Quick Dry Tacky Glue.  It bonds paper to paper very quickly, and that keeps parts from slipping out of place, etc.   I began by attaching the arms to the main body, and then adding the face.  Then I add the feet, the paws, the ears, nose, etc.  Note that the ears end up in two pieces, the main color outside and the pink inside.  If you’re assembling a stand-alone bunny, you’ll need something to hold the pink piece in the center of the main body color.  I just use a small strip of paper – making sure to glue it to the pink center as well as each side of the main color.  You can see this in the back view of the bunny below.  Also for the eyes, instead of wrangling the tiny little pupils (and cutting them from black, etc.), I find it easier to just cut a small strip of black paper and glue it to the back of the head.  Cheating?  Maybe. . . but why not?  I did the same thing for the feet on the sitting bunny.  It just seemed so much easier.

To assemble the card, I first selected a patterned paper to place the bunny on, and a coordinating base layer.  I cut the base layer 4.25” x 5.5” (A-2 size), and the patterned paper 3-7/8” x 5-1/8”.  I used Scor-Tape to attach the patterned layer to the base layer.   I also attached the completed bunny with Scor-Tape.  I stamped the sentiment on a small piece of white cardstock, and added it to the card with Scor-Tape.  The purple bow on the white bunny is one of the accessories on the die.  The carrots with the tan bunnies were also cut using the “Easter Bunny” die.  The accessory pieces were glued in place.

I thought the sitting bunny would also make a cute table decoration for Easter dinner – perhaps as a place holder or as a napkin ring.  It is really easy to add a triangle of paper to make the bunny sit up straight, or a circle to make a napkin ring, etc.  There are just so many options – especially when you add in all of the accessories.  Too much fun!  Here are a couple of pictures of the “support” for the sitting bunny.

back view  holder

Supply List:

Die-Versions die “Easter Bunny

Die cutting machine – I used my Big Kick by Sizzix

Assorted cardstock for the bunny – scraps will work fine

Assorted cardstock for the card layers

Adhesives – ¼” Scor-Tape by Scor-Pal, Scotch Quick Dry Tacky Glue

Sentiments – I used a set from Impression Obsession called “Easter Seals”

Ink – I used Memento London Fog, Angel Pink, Toffee Crunch, Bahama Blue, and Grape Jelly

Darice craft marshmallow

Copic multiliner pen – Cool Gray

 

Thanks and Happy Scrappin’!

Cheryl

Sizzix Susan’s Garden Paperwhites!

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Today I want to show you a gift that I made using Sizzix Susan’s Garden  Narcissus/Paperwhites dies.   Paperwhites are beautiful flowers that can bloom indoors in the worst of winters.  They add such beauty and fragrance, as well as a reminder that spring is just around the corner.  This year I received a Thanksgiving gift of some paper white bulbs.  It was such fun to watch them grow – very quickly they were more than three feet tall.  The blooms were lovely and fragrant.  I’ve included pictures below of the real flowers, as well as my interpretation.

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paperwhites  paperwhites tall

Paperwhites are very easy to assemble using the Sizzix die set.  First, I cut the pieces from the appropriate colors of cardstock.  I used a nice smooth heavy-weight (80lb.) cardstock to get the best results.  Lighter weight cardstocks or cardstocks that have a linen finish (or other rough finish) do not work as well.  The die set contains twelve dies – only one piece cut from each is needed to complete the flower.  I used my Sizzix Big Kick to cut the pieces.  These are the Thinlits dies, so there should be no difficulty using them in any die cutting machine.

Once the pieces were cut, it was simple to follow the directions from the Sizzix website to assemble the flowers.  Click on this link to access the instructions.  It is important to have the proper tools and mats in order to mold the paper appropriately.  I used the Sizzix Susan’s Garden tool set which includes the needed tools and mats to make any of the Susan’s Garden flowers.  The McGill flower-making tools will also work so long as you have both sets (including mats).  Note that where the instructions tell you to add adhesive to the stamens and dip in Woodland Scenic pollen, I did not use the adhesive or the pollen.  I just added a little orange Pan Pastel to the ends of the stamens for a more subtle color.  Please see the short video for a discussion of the tools and other supplies needed to successfully complete the flowers.

The most important thing in making the flowers is to take your time and work through assembly of the first flower.  Any flowers you do after that will be so much simpler and quicker.   Sizzix and the designer, Susan Tierney Cockburn, do such a nice job of breaking down the steps for making beautiful paper interpretations of the flowers that we love so much.  They are quite simple and so much fun to make!

Once the flowers were complete, it was very easy to attach them to the chalkboard frame using a little bit of Scor-Tape by Scor-Pal.   I tied a few strands of ivory burlap string to the burlap rope hanger on the chalkboard frame for added decoration.  This ended up being a very quick and easy project.

Supply List:

Sizzix Susan’s Garden paperwhite/narcissus dies set

Die cutting machine – I used my Sizzix Big Kick

Cardstock – white, cream, yellow and green

Flower tool set and mats – I used the Sizzix Susan’s Garden tool set

Small chalkboard frame

Adhesive – I used Scotch Quick Dry Adhesive and Scor-Tape by Scor-Pal

Pastels – I used orange (stamens) and bright yellow green (leaves) Pan Pastels

May Arts ivory burlap string

Scissors

 

Thanks and Happy Scrappin’!

Cheryl

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